Talking with wolves

Langedrag mountain farm and wildlife park is a marvellous place, and I go there at least once a year. In addition to the sheer beauty of the place, I think the people who run it are doing a great job. Tuva Thorson, the manager, has worked with wolves for more than thirty years, and she demonstrates how to communicate with them – in their language – every day in front of an audience. And the same is the case with the lynxes. I do not like to see wild animals behind a fence, but the wolves at Langedrag have access to a huge area, and I believe Tuva and her partners may be capable of destroying some myths and maybe even some people’s negative opinions about these predators. And that makes their work extremely important, as there are plenty of people in Norway who cannot see the value of having these magnificent animals as part of our nature.

Tuva is the leader of the pack (photo: Jan Nergård)
Tuva is the leader of the pack (photo: Jan Nergård)

Might have been a bit scary for some (Photo: Jan Nergård)
Might have been a bit scary for some (Photo: Jan Nergård)

They seem to understand each other (Photo: Jan Nergård)
They seem to understand each other (Photo: Jan Nergård)

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Author: Jan's bulletin board

I live in a part of the world called Norway with my wife and two daughters. I worked as a telecom engineer for 20 years. Nowadays I am attending a helpdesk supporting colleagues with computer problems. I am also a hobby photographer who believe we ought to pay more attention to how we treat our planet and each other. I trust the reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and I am disappointed that leading politicians in my own and other countries more or less have been ignoring warnings from the scientists for 20 years.

3 thoughts on “Talking with wolves”

    1. It is amazing. She goes in alone to the two wolves carrying meat in her hands. They respect her as their leader, and as the leader has the right to eat first, they do not touch the meat. But they read her body language with intense attention, and they know immediately when she signals that she is finished and they can have their share. The signals she use are sometimes so subtle that she has to tell the audience what she is doing.

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